How to set up a MySQL database server on Ubuntu for Drupal to WordPress migrations

Content Management System (CMS) migration projects involve moving data between databases with different schemas. Table names, field types and constraints often don’t match up, leading to a number of frustrating errors. This is especially the case with highly complex Drupal to WordPress migrations that use custom scripts to extract, transform and load the data. These projects can seem like you’re constantly hitting roadblocks throughout. I’ve found from experience that running the migration in an appropriate development environment can reduce a great deal of effort. In this guide, I will describe how to set up a MySQL database server on Ubuntu for Drupal to WordPress migrations.

Table of contents

Why MySQL and Ubuntu?

The first thing to address is why MySQL and Ubuntu? How about MariaDB? How about Arch Linux, Mac OS or Windows? Yes! Any platform that runs Drupal and WordPress will work for your migration environment so you can use whatever you prefer. Personally, I have a fondness for OpenBSD but it’s not a practical platform for a CMS migration. OpenBSD’s niche user-base means you’ll spend much longer installing necessary tools and troubleshooting errors.

There are all sorts of tutorials covering MySQL on Ubuntu. This means you’re more likely to quickly find a solution from a web search when you hit a problem. Furthermore, if you need a software utility or program to help you get the job done, it will probably be available through apt, dpkg, snap or tasksel. Use whatever you like but for now, MySQL on Ubuntu is my recommended platform for Drupal to WordPress migrations. I expect this will be the case for some time to come. These projects are complex and time-consuming enough without making the job more difficult.

Installing MySQL on Ubuntu for CMS migrations

There are many detailed tutorials for installing MySQL on Ubuntu. DigitalOcean’s How To Install MySQL on Ubuntu 20.04 is a good one and writing another won’t add much value. My guide will therefore only give a brief overview of the MySQL server installation steps. Instead, I will focus on the configuration areas specifically related avoiding problems on a CMS migration project.

You may wonder why the migration environment should be much different from a live server. Migration projects require you to do things that aren’t supported by the CMS platform. You’re therefore likely to encounter weird errors that aren’t normally found when running standard Drupal or WordPress.

Set up your Ubuntu LAMP migration platform

The main source of unusual errors is almost certainly because you’re migrating on a setup suited to a live website. Live server configurations are more restrictive than you need for a migration project. You can therefore save yourself a huge headache by rolling your own local migration environment. It might take a little longer to get started but you’ll save time by avoiding lots of unnecessary troubleshooting.

I must highlight that this will be a local migration environment and should not be accessible from the public internet. The normal security considerations with running a live content management system don’t apply when you’re working locally. By all means follow basic security measures mentioned the various tutorials for setting up Ubuntu and MySQL. Nevertheless, a highly secure setup is counterproductive for these projects and you can avoid trouble by being a little more permissive.

Go ahead and install Ubuntu Desktop. Since this will be a development environment, you’ll want the Desktop environment rather than the more lightweight server version. Of course, you’ll still need to install a web and database server. Follow these instructions for installing LAMP stack but skip the step of installing MariaDB. As mentioned above, we’ll be using MySQL.

WARNING: Installing MariaDB over MySQL or vice versa on Ubuntu 20.04 may lead to all sorts of problems starting up the database server with errors like the following:

Failed to start mysqld.service: Unit mysqld.service not found.

The last time I did this, none of solutions mentioned online for purging the installation worked. I spent most of a day trying to fix the problem. In the end, I realised it was quicker to start again and rebuild the machine from scratch. This is a big reason why I decided to stick with MySQL as standard for my projects.

Install MySQL

You can read a more detailed tutorial on installing MySQL on Ubuntu but here’s an overview.

  1. Update the package index on your server: sudo apt update
  2. Install MySQL server: sudo apt install mysql-server
  3. Secure MySQL: sudo /usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation

The mysql_secure_installation script doesn’t cause problems for migrations so it’s worth running.

Create an admin user:

CREATE USER 'user'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'userpassword';
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* to 'user'@'localhost' WITH GRANT OPTION;
FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
quit;

Now create a user and database for your migration project:

CREATE USER 'projectuser'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';

CREATE DATABASE project_db CHARACTER SET utf8mb4 COLLATE utf8mb4_unicode_520_ci;
GRANT ALL ON project_db.* TO 'projectuser'@'localhost';

You can give this user more restrictive permissions but GRANT ALL avoids errors when running scripts and SQL queries on the database. Only the migration team should have access and you won’t need it after the migration so why not make your life easier?

Setting the MySQL server SQL mode

It’s possible that you won’t be familiar with SQL modes unless you’ve done some database administration work. For our purposes, SQL modes do two things:

  • change the types of queries you can run on your MySQL server;
  • change the validation checks when altering the data.

I’ve found that specific SQL modes need to be set for Drupal to WordPress projects. You may find that all sorts of strange errors appear if the correct modes aren’t set. The following sections show you two ways to set your MySQL server’s SQL mode.

Option 1: Setting the global sql_mode in the database

  1. Login in to database as an admin user.
  2. View the current sql-modes using SELECT @@GLOBAL.sql_mode; and make a copy if necessary.
  3. Copy the current modes (add or delete modes as needed) and paste in next step.
  4. Add ALLOW_INVALID_DATES and removes both NO_ZERO_DATE, NO_ZERO_IN_DATE by setting the sql-modes with
    SET GLOBAL sql_mode = 'STRICT_TRANS_TABLES,ALLOW_INVALID_DATES,ERROR_FOR_DIVISION_BY_ZERO,NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION'; (WARNING: check the modes correspond with your setup.)
  5. Restart server:
    sudo systemctl start mysql

Option 2: setting the sql_mode in the MySQL configuration file

Locating the MySQL configuration file

The my.cnf configuration file isn’t always found in the same place. It’s specific to the Linux distribution and server configuration but can normally found in one of the following locations:

/etc/my.cnf
/etc/mysql/my.cnf
echo/my.cnf
[datadir]/my.cnf
~/.my.cnf

If you can’t find your MySQL configuration file, you can try running locate my.cnf or mysqladmin --help. The latter will show something like the following in the output:

Default options are read from the following files in the given order:
/etc/my.cnf /etc/mysql/my.cnf ~/.my.cnf

Also keep in mind that it’s possible to use !include directives to include other option files and !includedir to search specific directories for option files. Under Ubuntu, there may be a file /etc/mysql/my.cnf with !includedir directives to search /etc/mysql/conf.d/ and /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/

Editing the MySQL configuration file

If the MySQL server finds more than one configuration file, it will load each one in turn. The values override each other and it can be difficult to know which takes priority. Furthermore, the –defaults-file parameter can also override all configurations. Keep things simple and have only one file and place it the directory that makes sense to you.

Before editing the my.cnf, first log in to MySQL with an administrator user and run the SELECT @@GLOBAL.sql_mode query to see the values used in your setup.

Setting the MySQL database server sql mode on Ubuntu for Drupal to WordPress migrations
Running the SELECT @@GLOBAL.sql_mode query on MySQL Workbench

Next, open the configuration file, look for the section [mysqld] and edit the line starting with:
sql_mode = ...

Add the line if it’s not there. Adjust the exact modes to match your project’s needs so take a look at the list of SQL modes to see which may apply. I’ve found the following works well:
sql_mode = "STRICT_TRANS_TABLES,ALLOW_INVALID_DATES,ERROR_FOR_DIVISION_BY_ZERO,NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION"

Finally, restart the MySQL server. On Ubuntu this will probably be with

sudo systemctl start mysql

If you are logged in to the MySQL server, you may also need to disconnect your client and reconnect for the changes to take effect for your session.

Potential errors

Here are some potential errors that you may come across during a CMS migration project. I usually find them when running a Drupal to WordPress migration on a freshly built development environment.

mysqldump access denied when trying to dump tablespaces

Migrations involve dumping and importing databases and this process is straightforward on a mature development environment. However you may receive an ‘Access denied’ error out of the blue when dumping your MySQL database:

mysqldump: Error: 'Access denied; you need (at least one of) the PROCESS privilege(s) for this operation' when trying to dump tablespaces

If you see this, perhaps you were working on an environment that was a little too ‘mature’ (in other words, obsolete!) and you have recently upgraded your installation. The updates for MySQL 5.7.31 and MySQL 8.0.21 in July 2020 introduced an incompatible change that produces this error.

Read my separate article, How to fix the mysqldump access denied process privilege error, for more information and instructions on how you can try solving this.

ERROR 1067 (42000) Invalid default value

Drupal nodes store the date as a Unix timestamp in an int (e.g. 1623427200) field whereas WordPress stores dates as datetime (e.g. 2021-06-11 16:00:00). There may be a conversion error in your migration script or the source date could simply be zero for some reason. Normally your MySQL server mode will be set to NO_ZERO_DATE, NO_ZERO_IN_DATE so trying to insert a zero date will give you the error:

ERROR 1067 (42000) Invalid default value

You can fix this by replacing NO_ZERO_DATE, NO_ZERO_IN_DATE with set to ALLOW_INVALID_DATES in your global SQL mode.

Expression #1 of SELECT list is not in GROUP BY clause

You run an SQL query and get the rather cryptic error:

Expression #1 of SELECT list is not in GROUP BY clause and contains
nonaggregated column 'database.table.pid' which is not functionally dependent
on columns in GROUP BY clause; this is incompatible with sql_mode=only_full_group_by

What’s wrong? MySQL has a only_full_group_by mode which, when enabled, strictly applies ANSI SQL rules when using GROUP BY. Fix this by reworking your script or removing the ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY SQL mode.

Error Code: 2013. Lost connection to MySQL server

This often happens when it an SQL query takes too long to return data. The connection between your MySQL client and database server times out so the connection gets dropped. For ideas on how to try solving this, read my separate article, How to fix Error Code 2013 Lost connection to MySQL server.

Conclusion

Setting up a MySQL database server for Drupal or WordPress is a familiar task for web developers and site administrators. However, CMS migrations have quirks that can cause obscure and baffling errors. In this guide I’ve shown you some little tricks that may save time and annoyance. While there’s no way to provide an exhaustive list of solutions to all the MySQL problems you’ll encounter, I hope to have pointed you in the right direction.

If you have a site migration project and would like to hire me, please ask for a quote for my consulting service.

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Migrating content from a site and need a specialist? Please contact me for a quotation. Whether you’re a media agency who needs a database expert or a site owner looking for advice, I’ll save you time and ensure accurate content exports.

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How to fix the mysqldump access denied process privilege error

How to fix the mysqldump process privilege error after applying a recent MySQL update.

You may receive a new ‘Access denied’ error when trying to dump your MySQL database:

mysqldump: Error: 'Access denied; you need (at least one of) the PROCESS privilege(s) for this operation' when trying to dump tablespaces

You were able to export database before so what caused this? Here’s the answer: updates for MySQL 5.7.31 and MySQL 8.0.21 in July 2020 introduced an incompatible change:

Incompatible Change: Access to the INFORMATION_SCHEMA.FILES table now requires the PROCESS privilege.

This change affects users of the mysqldump command, which accesses tablespace information in the FILES table, and thus now requires the PROCESS privilege as well. Users who do not need to dump tablespace information can work around this requirement by invoking mysqldump with the --no-tablespaces option. (Bug #30350829)

This error appears when running mysqldump directly from the command line, exporting the database using a client like MySQL Workbench or if you’re managing the WordPress database through WP-CLI’s export command.

mysqldump: Error: 'Access denied; you need (at least one of) the PROCESS privilege(s) for this operation' when trying to dump tablespaces

In my case, I encountered the problem when running a routine Python script for a Drupal to WordPress migration client. My script uses WP-CLI to export a database dump file and deploy it to a remote server.

Solutions for fixing the mysqldump process privilege error

The mysqldump command requires at least the following privilege assigned to the user:

  • SELECT privilege for dumped tables
  • SHOW VIEW for dumped views
  • TRIGGER for dumped triggers
  • LOCK TABLES if you don’t use the --single-transaction option
  • PROCESS if you don’t use the --no-tablespaces option

The last PROCESS privilege is new as of MySQL 5.7.31 and MySQL 8.0.21 and may be the root source of your problem. You can solve the mysqldump process privilege error in two ways:

  1. Updating the privileges for your database user.
  2. Runing mysqldump with the --no-tablespaces option.

Solution 1: Update the user privileges

Granting the PROCESS privilege for the user is perhaps the simplest option for fixing the mysqldump process privilege error. Keep in mind that this option presents security issues. You should therefore really only use this option for your own local development server installation.

To grant the PROCESS privilege, log in as an administrator user and run the following query:

GRANT PROCESS ON *.* TO [email protected];

Note that PROCESS is a global level privilege. It can’t apply to individual databases. Global privileges are either administrative or apply to all databases on your MySQL server. Trying to grant them on individual databases deplays the following error:

ERROR 1221 (HY000): Incorrect usage of DB GRANT and GLOBAL PRIVILEGES

To grant the privilege to all databases you must use the ON *.* ... syntax.

Solution 2: Use the --no-tablespaces option

If you cannot assign global level privileges to your user, for example, when doing so presents unacceptable security issues, you must specify the --no-tablespaces option when dumping your database.

mysqldump --no-tablespaces -u user -ppass dbname > db_backup_file.sql

What are MySQL tablespaces?

We are usually only concerned with logical database objects when working with databases. However, the data must be physically stored somewhere. This is where tablespaces come in. Tablespaces are physical datafiles stored in the host file system holding data for one or more tables and indexes.

The diagram below provides a handy illustration. It’s from the Oracle Concepts documentation, Introduction to Tablespaces, Datafiles, and Control Files and refers to Oracle databases. Nevertheless, it may help you understand how tablespaces relate to logical database objects and datafiles.

Oracle documentation: Introduction to Tablespaces, Datafiles, and Control Files
Diagram source: Oracle Concepts documentation

You can therefore use the --no-tablespaces option if you don’t need to dump tablespace information. This may be the case for routine database dumps, for example when exporting databases for WordPress migrations.

About the access mysqldump denied PROCESS privilege error

mysqldump accesses tablespace information in the FILES table. Prior to MySQL 5.7.31 and 8.0.21, your user could run mysqldump without the PROCESS privilege. However, users running mysqldump after the update need PROCESS privileges to access the INFORMATION_SCHEMA.FILES table. Running mysqldump without PROCESS privilege ends up giving you an Access denied error.

Be careful with the PROCESS privilege

According to the MySQL documentation, the PROCESS privilege controls access to information about statements being executed by sessions.

It is a server administration privilege and should not be given to all users. This is because it may show text from currently executing queries. Any user with the PROCESS privilege may therefore see queries issued by others. Here’s the danger: these queries, such as UPDATE user SET password=PASSWORD, may show secrets.

For more information, see General Security Issues and the MySQL Access Privilege System from the O’Reilly MySQL Reference Manual.

Migrating Bare Bones Yojimbo to WordPress

In a previous post, I wrote about exporting data from Bare Bones Software’s Yojimbo and using Tomboy as an alternative. My migration script scraped the content from Yojimbo Sidekick and wrote XML files in Tomboy Note format. Though there were some drawbacks, such as tags being unavailable in Yojimbo Sidekick, I thought Tomboy’s search feature would be adequate. A couple of weeks trialling Tomboy proved that it wasn’t going to be a Yojimbo killer. Tomboy can’t compete in terms of overall usability and though it’ll work on my Linux and OS X machines, note synchronisation takes some setup that didn’t warrant further time investment.

Once again I turned to WordPress as an easy solution. There’s a risk of seeing WordPress as my hammer for everything that looks like a nail but it has taxonomies, a reliable-enough search functionality and being web-based, works across all my devices. I’m very familiar with the platform and have already built up my own set of tools to export and migrate content. Why not use WordPress? Getting data out of Yojimbo was another issue. The quick and easy Yojimbo Sidekick route already proved inadequate so it was time to dig in and reverse engineer Yojimbo’s storage mechanism.

Analysing and exporting the Yojimbo database

‘Reverse engineering’ turned out to be too lofty a term for the task. It was obvious after quick look that Yojimbo uses an SQLite database to store information. Firing up DB4S to analyse the tables and bit of analysis revealed the tables, columns and relationships that are important for exporting our notes. The columns are a little oddly named but it didn’t take long to figure out the necessary fields for migrating to WordPress.

Table: ZITEM
Column Description
ZBLOB This looks like an ID
ZNAME The Yojimbo note title
Z_PK The ID to the Z_15TAGS relationship table
Table: ZTAG
Column Description
Z_PK The Tag ID
ZNAME The tag name
Table: ZBLOBLSTRINGREP
Column Description
ZBLOB ID
ZSTRING String for unencrypted item
Table: Z_15TAGS
Column Description
Z_15ITEMS1 Relationship ID
Z_25ITAGS Tag ID

Yojimbo SQLite tables

It became a simple matter of tweaking my Drupal to WordPress migration queries to extract from the Yojimbo database and create WordPress posts. Unlike with the Tomboy Notes route, it was possible to recreate the tags, which is what makes Yojimbo so useful. One drawback is that I haven’t figured out how to extract encrypted notes but I didn’t use Yojimbo to store important encrypted information so that wasn’t a priority.

WordPress as a Yojimbo alternative

Using WordPress as a Yojimbo alternative might not work for everyone but after several months use, I’ve found it to be an excellent cross-platform replacement. The installation and database runs on a NAS drive connected to my local network so is accessible to all my devices. Standard WordPress taxonomies, search and plugins makes content management simple once you’ve imported the Yojimbo content. In fact, by migrating away from Yojimo, I’ve ended up creating my own full-blown personal knowledge management system.

If you need to export your Yojimbo notes to a cross-platform alternative, give WordPress a try. You can grab my migration script from GitLab but please keep in mind that it was a quick hack to achieve a specific one-time objective. You may need to hack it to suit your own setup.

Importing a WordPress database: How to fix the Unknown collation: ‘utf8mb4_unicode_ci’ error

If you do a lot of exporting and importing to different database servers, you’ll be familiar with the frustration of encountering MySQL import errors. Every so often when importing a WordPress dump file into a client’s database, I will encounter an Unknown collation error like the following:

Unknown collation: 'utf8mb4_unicode_ci'

Sometimes it will come up as:

Unknown collation: 'utf8mb4_unicode_520_ci'

This is caused by a difference in encoding types between the source and destination databases. It usually happens when you export from a newer MySQL database (MySQL 5.5.3 and above) which uses utf8mb4, then attempt to import into an older version using utf8. If you are importing from a dump file generated from a MySQL 5.6 database, you may get the utf8mb4_unicode_520_ci message. The 520 refers to MySQL’s use of Unicode Collation Algorithm 5.2.0. Unknown collation errors may also happen if you are trying to import a MariaDB database into MySQL. I tend to get unknown collation errors with my Rackspace Cloud accounts after Rackspace started offering MariaDB as a database option.

Ideally one would upgrade the older destination database but this isn’t always a realistic option. There are a number of discussion threads on the WordPress forum about what to do. Fortunately, many web hosting accounts have a phpMyAdmin interface which provides an easy work-around for the problem.

Format-specific options during a phpMyAdmin database export

  1. Log in to your database server using phpMyAdmin
  2. Make sure you select your database and go to the “Export” tab
  3. Select the “Custom” radio button
  4. Go the section “Format-specific options” and in the setting for “Database system or older MySQL server to maximize output compatibility with:” select MYSQL40.
  5. Scroll to the bottom and click GO.

phpMyAdmin format specific options to fix the Unknown collation: 'utf8mb4_unicode_ci' error

Other possible solutions include:

Since many of my WordPress database migrations are under my migration service, I don’t always have control over the client’s platform. The phpMyAdmin export format method is often the simplest solution.

Side-effects of a character encoding downgrade

You might be wondering about the purpose of encoding types and if there will be any side-effects of downgrading. Character encoding allows support for a set of characters, such as the Western alphabet, Asian scripts and non-alphanumeric symbols. Older utf8 databases support a smaller set of characters whereas utf8mb4 includes emojis, musical notation and Chinese Han characters. If you’ve ever exported a website from one CMS to another and found random characters scattered throughout the copy, it’s because of an incompatible character encoding.

Solving the unknown collation error as described here could mean you’ll end up with unsupported characters after your site migration. However, as with many of my Drupal to WordPress migration clients, in all likelihood you’ll be migrating from an older utf8 Drupal database to a newer utf8mb4-supported WordPress database. In this case, your old content will not have characters that will cause a problem after an encoding downgrade.

Drupal to WordPress migration notes

These Drupal to WordPress migration notes are intended for clients who are handling some aspects of the migration themselves. Users of the Drupal to WordPress Migration Tool or MySQL queries might also find information here to resolve some problems.

Admin account password and email address

Your content management system (CMS) administrator password and email address may have changed during the migration to help with debugging. Please update them as soon as possible.

Drupal and WordPress user passwords are encrypted and I do not have access to them in plaintext. However, for your peace of mind, I recommend that you also ask all your users to reset their passwords.

Server credentials

Please remember to change any database, (S)FTP, SSH server and control panel credentials you may have given me.

Working tables

During the migration process, I may create some working tables to hold temporary data. My naming convention for the working tables are as follows:

  • acc_ prefix: these are working tables created to help with migrating data.
  • backup_ prefix: these are backups of existing tables prior to migration, for example from a previous installation of your CMS. These will not be altered during the migration process.
  • _copy postfix: duplicates of WordPress tables copied for debugging will have a _copy postfix. These are different from the backup_ tables in that they may have been manually altered.

These working tables are not used by WordPress so you may safely delete them. However, it’s advisable to keep them for a short while as they may be useful in case we need to debug any issues that crop up.

Migrating to a live server

Most Drupal to WordPress migrations are performed on a test or development server. For help on how to move WordPress to your live server, please see: WordPress Codex: Moving WordPress.

Troubleshooting common errors after a site migration

Please see below for some common problems you may experience after migrating your Drupal content to a new WordPress site.

Incorrect domain in URLs

WordPress stores domains in the database. If you performed the migration on a local or development server, there’s a good chance that the links will be incorrect after migrating to your live server. Use the Interconnect IT utility to run a search and replace on your database. This will also correct changed database prefixes.

More information can be found on the interconnect/it Search Replace DB page.

“Sorry, you are not allowed to access this page”

If you try to log in via wp-admin and receive this error, you may have overwritten the administrator user’s wp_capabilities or wp_user_level.

Set the correct meta_value using the following SQL:

UPDATE wp_usermeta 
    SET meta_value = 'a:1:{s:13:"administrator";s:1:"1";}'
    WHERE user_id = 1 AND meta_key = 'wp_capabilities';

UPDATE wp_usermeta 
    SET meta_value = '10'
    WHERE user_id  = 1 AND meta_key = 'wp_user_level';

Remember to use the appropriate the user_id.

“You do not have sufficient permissions to access this page”

If you receive this error after logging in to your new WordPress installation, it’s possible that the database prefix on your new WordPress site is not set correctly. This may happen if you move your WordPress installation to a host that uses a different database prefix.

Try running one of the queries below. Replace wp_new_usermeta, oldprefix_ and newprefix_ as appropriate.

Option 1:

UPDATE wp_new_usermeta SET meta_key = REPLACE(meta_key,’oldprefix_’,’newprefix_’);

UPDATE wp_new_options SET option_name = REPLACE(option_name,’oldprefix_’,’newprefix_’);

Option 2:

update wp_new_usermeta set meta_key = ‘newprefix_usermeta’ where meta_key = ‘wp_capabilities’;

update wp_new_usermeta set meta_key = ‘newprefix_user_level’ where meta_key = ‘wp_user_level’;

update wp_new_usermeta set meta_key = ‘newprefix_autosave_draft_ids’ where meta_key = ‘wp_autosave_draft_ids’;

update wp_new_options set option_name = ‘newprefix_user_roles’ where option_name = ‘wp_user_roles’;

Please note that these queries may not work for you. Success depends on your specific setup.

For more information, please see the following pages:

“Unable to establish database connection”

The database credentials are correct but you see an “Unable to establish database connection” error. Check that wp_options table is not empty.

Allowed memory size exhausted

  1. Increase php.ini memory size
  2. Increase WP settings memory limit with:
    define(‘WP_MEMORY_LIMIT’, ‘128M’);

Post migrated but navigating to post shows blank page

The post is visible in the dashboard but viewing it displays a blank (but themed) page. Manually saving it on the dashboard makes it appear.

It’s possible that the problem posts need to be assigned to a category.

Post migrated but navigating to post shows ‘Not found’ error

The post is visible in the dashboard but viewing it displays a ‘not found’ error. Manually saving it on the dashboard makes it appear.

  1. Check that the url contains valid characters for a WordPress slug.
  2. Check that .htaccess is enabled in your Apache configuration

Link to author 404

Posts exist but link to the author’s post listing page is broken.

Check user_nicename in wp_users WordPress table. Make sure the nicename doesn’t contain invalid characters such as spaces, periods.

Dashboard controls not visible after logging in

If you are able to log in as an administrator user but do not see the Dashboard controls, check your table prefixes. If the table prefixes changed during the migration, you may have forgotten to update the options and usermeta tables.

Check where the old prefixes have been set:

SELECT * FROM `wpnew_options` WHERE `option_name` LIKE '%wp_%';
SELECT * FROM `wpnew_usermeta` WHERE `meta_key` LIKE '%wp_%';

Updated the prefixes. For example:

UPDATE `wpnew_options` SET `option_name` = 'wpnew_user_roles' WHERE `option_name` = 'wp_user_roles';
UPDATE `wpnew_usermeta` SET `meta_key` = 'wpnew_capabilities' WHERE `meta_key` = 'wp_capabilities';
UPDATE `wpnew_usermeta` SET `meta_key` = 'wpnew_user_level' WHERE `meta_key` = 'wp_user_level';

UPDATE `wpnew_usermeta` SET `meta_key` = 'wpnew_user-settings-time' WHERE `meta_key` = 'wp_user-settings-time';
UPDATE `wpnew_usermeta` SET `meta_key` = 'wpnew_user-settings' WHERE `meta_key` = 'wp_user-settings';

Further help

We’ll be very happy to provide support you if have difficulties after migration. For a quotation, please contact us. We also offer customised hosting and maintenance packages. Please ask for details.